Site Map Icon
RSS Feed icon
 
 
 

Today in Labor History

Nov. 25, 1883
Some 10,000 New Orleans workers, black and white, participate in a solidarity parade of unions comprising the Central Trades and Labor Assembly. The parade was so successful it was repeated the following two years.
- DC Labor

Member Login
Username:

Password:


Not registered yet?
Click Here to sign-up

Forgot Your Login?
  Member Resources  
     
How to Boost Unions’ Power? Sectoral Bargaining.
Posted On: Oct 22, 2020
Oct. 22, 2020 | LABOR UNIONS | In 1980 about a tenth of work­ers were cov­ered by mul­ti-employ­er agree­ments that set indus­try-wide stan­dards, espe­cial­ly work­ers in steel, auto, truck­ing, con­struc­tion and mining. What hap­pened? An onslaught of dereg­u­la­tion and anti-union attacks reversed those gains. Unions sim­ply lack the pow­er and mem­ber­ship to orga­nize entire sec­tors and indus­tries. Sec­toral or mul­ti-employ­er bar­gain­ing does exist — in heav­i­ly union­ized indus­tries, like hos­pi­tal­i­ty — but, most­ly, unions nego­ti­ate wages and improve con­di­tions at one indi­vid­ual work­site at a time. The Pro­tect­ing the Right to Orga­nize Act would remove some of the major dif­fi­cul­ties faced by union orga­niz­ers and passed in the House ear­li­er this year. It now waits in the Sen­ate. Like so much else, its chance of becom­ing law any time soon great­ly depends on who wins in Novem­ber. If it does pass, unions can begin the process of rebuild­ing their bar­gain­ing pow­er from the bot­tom up… In These Times  [Note: The Teamsters Union has national master agreements in the freight, warehouse, and passenger transportation industries, among others.]
 
 
Teamsters local 570
Copyright © 2020, All Rights Reserved.
Powered By UnionActive™

970854 hits since May 20, 2010
Visit Unions-America.com!

Top of Page image