Phone: 410-284-5081
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    What We Do
    Local 570 has been fighting for working men and women for 80 years. By joining together, members have strength in numbers so that they have a voice at work about the issues they care about. We support them in the workplace and on the legislative and political fronts to ensure their best interests are represented.
     
    Who We Are
    Local 570 is staffed by hard-working men and women experienced in labor relations and workers’ rights. Our Executive Board members come from the shops we represent, with the experience and knowledge needed to be strong, firm voices on behalf of union members.
     
    Who We Represent
    Local 570 represents workers employed in a variety of industries, including Warehouse, Dairy, Bakery, Laundry & Linen, Brewery & Soft Drink, Solid Waste & Recycling, Professional & Technical, Passenger Transportation, and General Sales.

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    Latest Labor News
    Nov. 29, 2021 | WORKERS' RIGHTS | A regional director for the U.S. National Labor Relations Board on Monday called for a rerun of a union election at an Amazon.com facility in Alabama, setting the stage for another high-profile organizing battle at the world's largest online retailer. Workers at the warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, rejected forming a union by a more than 2-to-1 margin in April after an organizing drive that garnered support from U.S. lawmakers and President Joe Biden. In August, an NLRB hearing officer said the company's conduct around the previous vote had interfered with the election. The decision for a redo adds pressure on Amazon, which has recently faced union campaigns in New York and Canada. Worker groups view organizing the company as a landmark goal that would invigorate the U.S. labor movement… Reuters  “Today’s decision confirms what we were saying all along – that Amazon’s intimidation and interference prevented workers from having a fair say in whether they wanted a union in their workplace.” Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) statement
    Nov. 29, 2021 | OPINION | […] How do we create good jobs and improve the quality of existing ones? It starts with revamping our labor laws so that no matter their job or industry, all working people can join together in unions to bargain for a better future. There's plenty of evidence, historical and modern, showing that union jobs are better jobs and that they improve public health, drive business and economic growth, and strengthen democracy. The public agrees…The problem is that it's simply too hard for workers to join a union—unions represent just 6.3% of the private workforce in the U.S. That's why we must prioritize eliminating the systemic barriers workers face in joining unions, from outdated labor laws to rampant union-busting… Business Insider

    Nov. 23, 2021 | ECONOMY | The Teamsters said [Friday] that lawmakers must push companies to improve wages and working conditions for truck drivers as they seek solutions to upgrade the movement of goods across the country instead of considering industry proposals like allowing teenagers to drive big rigs that would only endanger motorists nationwide. In response to a hearing held Wednesday by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee looking at the state of the U.S. supply chain, the union is demanding that lawmakers consider the root of the problem – poor pay and treatment by trucking companies. The shipment of goods nationwide will continue to be hindered until the government addresses such things as the misclassification of drivers. "Truckers continue to be taken for granted by big business even after all the work they did to keep America running during the most difficult days of the coronavirus pandemic," Teamsters General President Jim Hoffa said. "Opening up the industry to inexperienced teenage drivers will allow companies to take advantage of them while also making traveling more unsafe." ucommblog.com

    Nov. 22, 2021 | WORKING AMERICA | More than 14 million workers across the United States – carpenters, steelworkers, nurses, teachers, truck drivers, and many others – are union members, but rarely does one read how unions have improved workers’ jobs and lives. There are plenty of stories about weeks-long strikes, hard-fought union drives, unions’ role in political campaigns, and unions fighting to raise the minimum wage. Perhaps it’s considered too prosaic, but there are hardly any stories that examine in depth how belonging to a union or joining a union has changed workers’ lives and improved things for their families. This report takes a look at five workers – a construction worker, a charter school teacher, a barista, a forklift operator at a warehouse, and a hospital aide – and documents how belonging to a union has lifted those workers, has improved pay and benefits and given them a far stronger voice at work… American Prospect  Photo: Donnell Jefferson, Teamsters 667, is interviewed for this story

      Older U.S. workers are ‘unretiring
      • Inflation surge is gobbling up workers’ pay raises
      • Mistreatment fueling shortage of truck drivers
      • Teamster warns: ‘Soon, we’ll all be working for Amazon’
      • Poll shows 74% of voters OK strikes for higher pay, benefits
      • Kellogg’s workers stand strong as cereal strike stretches on
      • Hoffa: House passage of Build Back Better Act is boon for working families
      • US school bus drivers strike over poor pay, Covid risk
      • John Oliver on union-busting …

     

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act last year, but anti-worker legislators in the Senate blocked it. Undeterred, working people fought to elect pro-worker lawmakers to the Senate, House and White House. And we won. The House passed the PRO Act for a second time on March 9, 2021, sending the bill to the U.S. Senate. If it passes, it would: Empower workers to organize and bargain; hold corporations accountable for union-busting; and repeal “right to work” laws which were created during the Jim Crow era to keep White and Black workers from organizing together. Lawmakers gave us their word they would make the PRO Act a top priority. It’s time for them to keep that promise. Stronger unions mean higher wages, safer working conditions and dignity for all people who work. The #PROAct is our first step to get there.

    Since 1910, the Teamster logo has consisted of two horses' heads, representing the complementary forces of strength inherent in the Teamster organization. A well-known emblem, most people recognize it but are unsure of the story behind it. The horses' names are Thunder and Lightning; Thunder is male and Lightning, female.

    Local 570 members and their representatives negotiate wages, benefits, and job security, resolve grievances, and secure health and safety protections during a pandemic because, as a union, they have a seat at the table with their employers.

    We want to take the time to reach out to you, our brothers and sisters — and your families as we continue to go through very challenging times with the coronavirus pandemic. We know you still have many questions and concerns during these unprecedented times. While the uncertainty can be stressful and unsettling, we believe we will get through these times together and emerge stronger than before. If you need additional information about the coronavirus, please do not hesitate to call the Local Office. We will continue to look for ways to assist and support you during this difficult time. Stay safe, stay well, stay strong — and stay informed!

    Teamsters Local 570 
    410.284.5081
    team570@comcast.net

    "The Union that Works for You"


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