Site Map Icon
RSS Feed icon
 
 
 

Today in Labor History

Sept. 17, 1989
The ten-month Pittston Coal strike began on this date, as 98 miners and a minister occupied the Pittston Coal Company’s Moss 3 preparation plant in Carbo, Virginia. The strike began after Pittston terminated health benefits for retirees, widows and disabled miners. State troopers were called in to arrest strikers after violent conflicts erupted, yet the struggle barely made the news the United States. Arguably the most militant strike of the time, the United Mine Workers (UMWA) engaged in a variety of actions, ranging from a nonviolent takeover to mineworkers blockading the road into the plants, leading to their arrest. The United Mine Workers (UMWA) ultimately won, and the Pittston strike became one of the few labor victories of the 1980s.
- Voices of Labor

Member Login
Username:

Password:


Not registered yet?
Click Here to sign-up

Forgot Your Login?
  Member Resources  
     
UnionActive Newswire
 
Join the Newswire!
Updated: Sep. 18 (04:43)

Strike Line Solidarity!
Teamsters Local 776
Space is limited - RSVP today! Sept 27th - Health & Financial Awareness Conference
Los Angeles College Faculty Guild - Local 1521
Successful Bowl-A-Thon
CWA Local 7777
Strike information update - insurance
UAW Local 602
We Got Another JOB for You!
GCC/IBT District Council 4
80,000 Kaiser Permanente Workers to Strike in October
Teamsters local 570
 
     
GM Is Proof to the World That Slashing Wages Isn’t the Ticket to Profitability
Posted On: Dec 05, 2018
Dec. 5, 2018 | ECONOMY | General Motors just gave its workers a lot less reasons to feel grateful, announcing right after the Thanksgiving holiday that the automobile manufacturer planned to cut its salaried workforce by 15 percent, to dump most of its car models and to kill off five North American plants…some of GM’s problems have been self-inflicted, given its patchy record on safety matters and its abhorrent downplay of the resultant accidents. The company also put some of the blame on Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs, which they claimed added about $1 billion in additional costs. Upon closer inspection, however, the layoffs can’t simply be dismissed as an inevitable byproduct of globalization, or the impairment of free trade. There is something else going on here… AlterNet
 
 
Teamsters local 570
Copyright © 2019, All Rights Reserved.
Powered By UnionActive™

822174 hits since May 20, 2010
Visit Unions-America.com!

Top of Page image